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PfeilHarry Golombek
 

Richard Reti’s Best Games



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The first thing to notice here, apart from the expressive portrait of Reti, is the clanger on the cover: Golombek's name misspelt as 'Golmbek'. Presumably the design was done by a non-chessplayer, which often leads to trouble. Rumour has it that the accounts department of a certain other publishing house (not Batsford) occasionally try to send royalty cheques to authors long since deceased such as J.R. Capablanca and A. Alekhine.

Misprints aside, however, Batsford are to be encouraged for their endeavours to restore the historical link with the great masters of the past, by converting out-of-print descriptive notation titles into contemporary algebraic. This latest project, bringing the talents of creative thinker Richard Reti to a new generation, is particularly worthwhile.

Reti's career was cut cruelly short when he died of scarlet fever in a Prague hospital in 1929, aged 40, but in the twenty or so years of his active 'chess life' he enjoyed world class success, which included prestigious tournament wins at Gothenburg (1920) and Teplitz-Schönau (1922, first equal). He also became famous for the revolutionary theories contained in his great works "Modern Ideas in Chess" and "Masters of the Chessboard" (unfinished at the time of his death). Golombek's book, first published by Bell in 1954, contains 70 of Reti's finest wins, including those over world champions Capablanca, Alekhine and Euwe. Also to be found here are 20 of his famous endgame studies, and a warm tribute to Reti as a player and an artist.

Once again Grandmaster John Nunn, editor of the Batsford Algebraic Classics series, adds an analytical polish to the original, and pays tribute to Reti's positional theories: "There is no better way to learn them than to study his games, in which he put his own ideas into practice so effectively." Indeed, Game 43 versus Bogolyubow (New York 1924) is described by Nunn as "one of the greatest games ever played".

The first thing to notice here, apart from the expressive portrait of Reti, is the clanger on the cover: Golombek's name misspelt as 'Golmbek'. Presumably the design was done by a non-chessplayer, which often leads to trouble. Rumour has it that the accounts department of a certain other publishing house (not Batsford) occasionally try to send royalty cheques to authors long since deceased such as J.R. Capablanca and A. Alekhine.

Misprints aside, however, Batsford are to be encouraged for their endeavours to restore the historical link with the great masters of the past, by converting out-of-print descriptive notation titles into contemporary algebraic. This latest project, bringing the talents of creative thinker Richard Reti to a new generation, is particularly worthwhile.

Reti's career was cut cruelly short when he died of scarlet fever in a Prague hospital in 1929, aged 40, but in the twenty or so years of his active 'chess life' he enjoyed world class success, which included prestigious tournament wins at Gothenburg (1920) and Teplitz-Schönau (1922, first equal). He also became famous for the revolutionary theories contained in his great works "Modern Ideas in Chess" and "Masters of the Chessboard" (unfinished at the time of his death). Golombek's book, first published by Bell in 1954, contains 70 of Reti's finest wins, including those over world champions Capablanca, Alekhine and Euwe. Also to be found here are 20 of his famous endgame studies, and a warm tribute to Reti as a player and an artist.

Once again Grandmaster John Nunn, editor of the Batsford Algebraic Classics series, adds an analytical polish to the original, and pays tribute to Reti's positional theories: "There is no better way to learn them than to study his games, in which he put his own ideas into practice so effectively." Indeed, Game 43 versus Bogolyubow (New York 1924) is described by Nunn as "one of the greatest games ever played".

In Richard Reti's Best Games (engl.) widmet sich Harry Golombek dem (so behauptet es zumindest das Cover) "all-time deepest thinker". Ich weiß nicht, was der Titel "tiefster Denker aller Zeiten" bedeuten soll, aber die Biographie, eine überarbeitete Neuauflage des Werkes von 1954, fand ich lesenswert.

Golombek kommentiert insgesamt 70 Partien, von 1907 bis zu Retis letztem Turnier in Trentschin-Teplitz 1928. Außerdem werden 20 der schönsten Endspielstudien Retis präsentiert; Reti war einer der wenigen Weltklassespieler, die auch auf diesem Gebiet ein reiches Schaffen vorweisen können. Störend empfand ich nur die Stellen, an denen Golombek sich zu sehr bemüht, die Partien Retis zu mystifizieren und unkritisch über echte Fehler hinweggeht bzw. sich dieser nicht bewußt ist. Glücklicherweise kommt hier John Nunns Bearbeitung zum Tragen. [...]

Christopher Lutz, Schach 03/98




Preis: 
 
Artikelnummer:
LXGOLRRBG
 
Kategorie:
PfeilPartiensammlungen
  PfeilBiographien
 
Sprache:
Englisch
 
Verlag:
PfeilBatsford Chess
 
ISBN-10:
0713481692
 
ISBN-13:
 
Breite: 
13,7 cm
 
Höhe: 
21,5 cm
 
Gewicht: 
0,270 kg
 
Dieses Bild zeigt Richard Reti's Best Games: vergriffen, Hersteller: Batsford Chess, Preis: 21.85 €
192 Seiten, 200 Diagramme, kartoniert, 1997.
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